Publications

N
The Songs of the Sabbath Sacrifice: Edition, Translation, and Commentary
Newsom CA. The Songs of the Sabbath Sacrifice: Edition, Translation, and Commentary.; 1985. Publisher's Version
The Symbolic Vision in Biblical Tradition
Niditch S. The Symbolic Vision in Biblical Tradition.; 1983. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Using the developmental history-of-traditions approach, Susan Niditch leads the reader to a new understanding of the interrelationships between twelve symbolic visions found in the Old Testament: Amos 7:7-9, 8:1-3, Jeremiah 1:11-12, 1:13-19, Jeremiah 24, Zechariah 1:7-17, 2:1-4, 2:5-9, 4:1-6a, 4:10b-14, 5:1-4, 5:5-11, 6:1-8, Daniel 7 and 8. Four visions from 2 Baruch and 4 Ezra are also studied briefly.

P
West Semitic Vocabulary in the Akkadian Texts from Emar
Pentiuc EJ. West Semitic Vocabulary in the Akkadian Texts from Emar.; 2001. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Part 1 of this study is a glossary with comparative analysis of non-normative Akkadian forms, Hittite and Hurrian words, West Semitic lexemes, and words of uncertain origin, with special attention given to the West Semitic forms. Part 2 consists of grammatical observations pertaining to the West Semitic forms, under the headings orthography, phonology, and morphology.

Ashkelon 4: The Iron Age Figurines of Ashkelon and Philistia
Press MD. Ashkelon 4: The Iron Age Figurines of Ashkelon and Philistia.; 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

In this volume, Dr. Michael D. Press publishes the complete Iron Age corpus of terracotta anthropomorphic and zoomorphic figurines from the Leon Levy Expedition. Adapting a methodology of typology, iconography, and iconology, Press lays out his theoretical framework for analyzing and understanding the figurines of Ashkelon and those from Philistine cultures. Throughout this study, which covers nearly six centuries of Philistine life, the well-dated archaeological contexts of the figurines are stressed as much as their form and decoration. With an uncanny eye for form and detail, Press succeeds in changing our understanding of Philistine iconography while providing a model of method and theory that could be applied to the coroplastic art of many cultures.

Water in the Wilderness: A Biblical Motif and Its Mythological Background
Propp WH. Water in the Wilderness: A Biblical Motif and Its Mythological Background.; 1987. Publisher's Version
Q
The Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls
Qimron E. The Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls.; 1986. Publisher's VersionAbstract

In 1986, Elisha Qimron published the first comprehensive study of the Hebrew language of the scrolls from Qumran, examining the orthography, phonology, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary of the language. The study also includes a subject and word index. Even now, over twenty years later, his work remains the standard reference on the subject. Recognizing the need to keep it available, this paperback reprint has now been issued by the Harvard Semitic Museum/Eisenbrauns.

R
Studies in Semitic Grammaticalization
Rubin A. Studies in Semitic Grammaticalization.; 2005. Publisher's VersionAbstract

This groundbreaking study examines the historical development of the Semitic languages from the point of view of grammaticalization, the linguistic process whereby lexical items and constructions lose their lexical meaning and serve grammatical functions. The author first provides an introduction to this process, followed by a comprehensive overview--with abundant examples from ancient and modern languages--of how it is exemplified in Semitic. Three successive chapters are devoted to in-depth studies of specific cases of grammaticalization: the definite article in Central Semitic, direct object markers across Semitic, and present tense prefixes in modern Arabic and Aramaic dialects. Drawing on evidence from many non-Semitic languages, from recent developments in the field of historical linguistics, and from traditional comparative Semitics, this book represents a major contribution to the field of comparative Semitics.

S
An Exodus Scroll from Qumran: 4Qpaleo Exodm and the Samaritan Tradition
Sanderson JE. An Exodus Scroll from Qumran: 4Qpaleo Exodm and the Samaritan Tradition.; 1986. Publisher's Version
The House of the Father as Fact and Symbol: Patrimonialism in Ugarit and the Ancient Near East
Schloen DJ. The House of the Father as Fact and Symbol: Patrimonialism in Ugarit and the Ancient Near East.; 2001. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The first two volumes on patrimonialism in Ugarit and the ancient Near East, this book opens with a lengthy introduction on the interpretation of social action and households in the ancient world. Following this foundation, Schloen embarks on a societal and domestic study of the Late Bronze Age kingdom of Ugarit in its wider Near Eastern context.

Non-Canonical Psalms from Qumran: A Pseudepigraphic Collection
Schuller EM. Non-Canonical Psalms from Qumran: A Pseudepigraphic Collection.; 1986. Publisher's Version
Myth, Drama, and the Politics of David's Dance
Seow CL. Myth, Drama, and the Politics of David's Dance.; 1990. Publisher's Version
The Origins and Development of the Waw-Consecutive: Northwest Semitic Evidence from Ugarit to Qumran
Smith MS. The Origins and Development of the Waw-Consecutive: Northwest Semitic Evidence from Ugarit to Qumran.; 1991. Publisher's Version
Ashkelon 3: The Seventh Century B.C.
Stager LE, Master DM, Schloen DJ. Ashkelon 3: The Seventh Century B.C.; 2011. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Ashkelon 3: The Seventh Century B.C, written by Lawrence E. Stager, Daniel M. Master, and J. David Schloen has won of the 2012 Irene Levi-Sala Book Prize. The Irene Levi-Sala Book prize award is dedicated by the Sala Family Trust, London, to the memory of Dr. Irene Levi-Sala, who was a gifted archaeologist and maintained a keen interest in the culture and archaeology of Israel. The purpose of this prestigious prize is to encourage and reward high quality publications, both scholarly and popular, on the archaeology of Israel against the wider context of Near Eastern history and archaeology.

The Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon continues its final report series with a study of the city destroyed in the campaign of the Babylonian king Nebuchadrezzar in December of 604 B.C. In this era, Ashkelon’s markets linked land routes from the southeast to a web of international Mediterranean merchants, and this volume describes the Iron Age bazaar where shopkeepers sold the goods of Egypt, Greece, Phoenicia, Cyprus, and Judah. In addition, in another part of the city, a winery produced a homegrown vintage for distribution abroad.

This volume spans more than 800 full-color pages illustrating the range of imported and local artifacts recovered by more than ten years of excavation. The twenty-eight chapters, by more than two dozen contributors, combine to describe Ashkelon’s pivotal role in the economy and politics of the late seventh century B.C. As such, Ashkelon 3: The Seventh Century B.C. is a indispensable resource for those interested in the Iron Age history of the Eastern Mediterranean and the study of trade and economy in the ancient world.

Ashkelon 1: Introduction and Overview (1985-2006)
Stager LE, Schloen DJ, Master DM. Ashkelon 1: Introduction and Overview (1985-2006).; 2008. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Since 1985, the Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon, directed by Lawrence E. Stager of Harvard University, has been a leading American archaeological project in Israel. Now, the work of the project is being collected in ten final report volumes published by the Harvard Semitic Museum. The first volume, Introduction and Overview (1985-2006), spans more than 700 copiously illustrated pages, many in full color, and includes subjects ranging from microscopic DNA to monumental architecture. In addition, Volume 1 includes plans and descriptions of every architectural phase excavated during the course of seventeen field seasons and reveals the archaeological sequence of the site and aspects of the city plan from the Bronze Age to Crusader times, with special emphasis on Canaanite (Bronze Age) and Philistine (Iron Age) Ashkelon. The chapters in this volume, by more than three dozen contributors, combine to describe Ashkelon's cultural constants and contingencies over la longue durée (3000 BCE to 1500 CE).  As a result, Ashkelon 1: Introduction and Overview (1985-2006) will be an indispensable resource for investigating the maritime and terrestrial history of the southeastern Mediterranean littoral.

Early Northwest Semitic Serpent Spells in the Pyramid Texts
Steiner RC. Early Northwest Semitic Serpent Spells in the Pyramid Texts.; 2011. Publisher's VersionAbstract

New: Seven high-resolutions scans are now available online for browsing key images of the pyramid of Unas in detail: Antechamber, North Wall (right) and West Wall | Antechamber, West Wall | Sarcophagus Chamber, East Wall | Sarcophagus Chamber, West Wall | Sarcophagus Chamber, West Gable, center | Antechamber, East Wall, upper | Antechamber, East Wall, lower

The earliest connected Semitic texts known to modern scholars are usually thought to be East Semitic texts from Mesopotamia, written in the cuneiform script. In this monograph, Richard C. Steiner deciphers Semitic texts that are even earlier--Northwest Semitic texts in hieroglyphic script that have been "hiding in plain sight" among the Pyramid Texts of the Old Kingdom.

The Semitic texts are embedded in two series of Egyptian spells designed to protect the king's mummy against snakes. They are orthographically distinct from the rest of the Pyramid Texts, characterized by exceptional phonetic spelling reminiscent of the "group writing" used to write foreign names and texts in later times. Most editors of the Pyramid Texts have considered them unintelligible.

The Semitic and Egyptian passages in these spells are mutually elucidating. The Egyptian context contains phrases that reveal the meaning of corresponding Semitic phrases as well as clues that reveal the origin of the texts. The Semitic, in turn, helps to clarify the Egyptian, bringing a degree of cohesiveness and order to a group of spells that previously seemed like a hodgepodge. As Robert K. Ritner writes in his foreword to the monograph: "We have thus gone from a string of isolated invocations, many of them gibberish, to a coherent logically constructed, tripartite ritual with a recognizable beginning, middle, and end. This seems to me a remarkable advance."

The Material Culture of the Northern Sea Peoples in Israel
Stern E. The Material Culture of the Northern Sea Peoples in Israel.; 2013. Publisher's VersionAbstract

This monograph is the product of Stern's two decades of excavation at Tel Dor on the Carmel Coast, a city that Egyptian sources indicate was ruled in the eleventh century BCE by a Sikil king. Near the end of the period during which he directed excavations there, Stern began to notice the unique material culture of the Northern Sea Peoples and connected this material with discoveries in adjacent regions and in the north of Israel. A related survey of the ‘Akko Valley conducted by Avner Raban resulted in a further accumulation of data that supported the conclusion that the Sea Peoples that Egyptian sources indicated had settled in this region had in fact left behind evidence of their presence. This realization preceded the appearance of additional information—both material culture and inscriptions—that reflected the presence of Northern Sea Peoples throughout portions of northern Syria and southern Anatolia.

Two main principles guide Stern's study. (1) Historical sources provide the best evidence for contemporary events—in this case, specifically, the evidence concerns the Sikils and Sherden, as well as biblical sources that refer to Northern Sea Peoples as "Philistines" and that recount their wars with Israel in the north of the land, in the Jezreel Valley, and in Gilboa. (2) Ethnic archaeology is a genuine concept: every people that settles in any area naturally leaves marks of its own culture. The conclusion that is traced here, then, is that the culture of the Northern Sea Peoples, though difficult to identify, nonetheless did leave clear evidence that becomes apparent when the relevant strata at sites along the coast from the Yarkon and farther north and in the 'Akko and Jezreel Valleys are examined.

In this volume Stern presents the most complete picture that can be drawn from the evidence uncovered in the past few decades. Lavish illustrations accompany the discussion.

Features of the Eschatology of IV Ezra
Stone ME. Features of the Eschatology of IV Ezra.; 1989. Publisher's Version
T
Eighth-Century Iraqi Grammar: A Critical Exploration of Pre-Halilian Arabic Linguistics
Talmon R. Eighth-Century Iraqi Grammar: A Critical Exploration of Pre-Halilian Arabic Linguistics.; 2003. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Arabic grammatical thinking provides one of the richest and most significant contributions of medieval Islamic sciences to the history of human civilization. For the first time, this book traces down its formation during the second century of Islam (eighth century A.D.), before the age of the famous Halil b. Ahmad and his disciple Sibawayhi. Some 240 excerpts extracted from the earliest sources of the eighth and ninth centuries create a unique database, which is then analyzed critically. Consequently a clear scheme emerges of the sophisticated grammar of this pre-Halilian era. As a result, Halil's and Sibawayhi's revolt on this tradition is considered in detail.

The Archaeology of Israelite Samaria, Volume 1: Early Iron Age through the Ninth Century B.C.E.
Tappy RE. The Archaeology of Israelite Samaria, Volume 1: Early Iron Age through the Ninth Century B.C.E.; 1992. Publisher's Version
The Archaeology of Israelite Samaria, Volume 2
Tappy RE. The Archaeology of Israelite Samaria, Volume 2.; 2001. Publisher's VersionAbstract

In this comprehensive study, Professor Tappy rounds out the study of the Iron Age strata at Samaria that he began with the first volume of this work, published in 1992 (The Early Iron Age through the Ninth Century, HSS 44). Tappy's goal is to provide a thorough-going analysis of prior archaeologists' work at this important north Israelite site, with a view to providing a complete reconstruction of the depositional history of the site during the Iron Age. The two volumes together are important, not only for the history of the city of Samaria, but for the archaeological sequences of the Iron Age in northern Israel.

Pages