Publications

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A Grammar of the Palestinian Targum Fragments from the Cairo Genizah
Fassberg SE. A Grammar of the Palestinian Targum Fragments from the Cairo Genizah.; 1991. Publisher's Version
The Installation of Baal's High Priestess at Emar: A Window on Ancient Syrian Religion
Fleming DE. The Installation of Baal's High Priestess at Emar: A Window on Ancient Syrian Religion.; 1992. Publisher's Version
Semitic Noun Patterns
Fox J. Semitic Noun Patterns.; 2003. Publisher's VersionAbstract

This is the first complete study of Semitic internal noun patterns since that of Jacob Barth, over a century ago. Drawing on the earlier work of Semitists and linguists, this work presents a comprehensive new synthesis. This diachronic-comparative study presents the internal patterns individually and organizes them systematically. This study investigates the special role of noun patterns in isolated nouns and gives a complete list of reconstructible isolated nouns.

This diachronic-comparative study presents the internal patterns individually and organizes them systematically. The roles of the patterns in the derivation of nouns from roots, and in nominal inflection, are shown as part of a reconstructed system. This study investigates the special role of noun patterns in isolated nouns, and gives a complete list of reconstructible isolated nouns.

The heart of the book is devoted to studies of all individual reconstructible internal patterns with their Semitic reflexes, including mono- and bisyllabics and patterns with ungeminated or geminated second or third consonants.

The book reaches conclusions on the structure of the Proto-Semitic pattern system, including categories of reconstructible and non-reconstructible patterns, semantic groups of patterns, and relationships between different patterns. Further, patterns merge and split diachronically, appearing in different roles in the attested languages, where new pattern systems are formed.

Leaves from an Epigrapher's Notebook: Collected Papers in Hebrew and West Semitic Palaeography and Epigraphy
Huehnergard J, Hackett JA. Leaves from an Epigrapher's Notebook: Collected Papers in Hebrew and West Semitic Palaeography and Epigraphy. (Frank Moore Cross J).; 2003. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The editors have assembled here 55 key articles and notes by the well-known Harvard professor, organizing them under the categories Palaeography, Transjordanian Epigraphy, Hebrew Inscriptions, Aramaic Texts, and Old Canaanite and Phoenician Inscriptions. These essays, scattered in journals and various books, have now been brought together in one volume for easy access and attest to the life-long interest and contributions of one of the best-known epigraphers and palaeographers of the last 50 years.

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Gitin S, Dothan T, Garfinkel Y. Tel Miqne-Ekron Excavations, 1985–1988, 1990, 1992–1995: Field IV Lower—The Elite Zone, Part 9/3A: The Iron Age I and IIC Early and Late Philistine Cities Database. Winona Lake, Indiana: Eisenbrauns; 2016. Publisher's Version miqne-ekron_9/3A_database.pdf
Tel Miqne-Ekron Excavations, 1985–1988, 1990, 1992–1995: Field IV Lower—The Elite Zone, Part 3B: The Iron Age I and IIC Early and Late Philistine Cities Plans and Sections
Gitin S, Dothan T, Garfinkel Y. Tel Miqne-Ekron Excavations, 1985–1988, 1990, 1992–1995: Field IV Lower—The Elite Zone, Part 3B: The Iron Age I and IIC Early and Late Philistine Cities Plans and Sections. Harvard Semitic Museum / Eisenbrauns; 2016. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Tel Miqne-Ekron Field IV Lower—The Elite Zone, The Iron Age I and IIC, The Early and Late Philistine Cities, Parts 9/1-9/3B present the evidence of two large Philistines cites, one in Iron I, the period of its initial development, and the other in Iron IIC, its final stage when it achieved its zenith of physical growth and prosperity. They also offer a unique opportunity to check and evaluate the excavators' observations and conclusions based on their comprehensive database. Published under the auspices of the Harvard Semitic Museum, they comprise the final reports of the nine seasons of excavations during the years 1985-1995, directed by Trude Dothan and Seymour Gitin and sponsored by the W. F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research and the Hebrew University.

Volume 9/1, The Iron Age I Early Philistine City covers Strata VII-IV, the 12th-early 10th centuries BCE. It includes a detailed discussion of the occupational history of the period with a comprehensive analysis of the ceramic assemblages and a selection of ceramic, lithic, clay, and metal objects with detailed discussions of jewelry, scarabs and ivory objects, as well as the faunal evidence. Volume 9/2, The Iron Age IIC Late Philistine City, which presents the evidence from Stratum I of the 7th and early 6th century BCE, is in press.

Volume 9/3A, The Iron Age I and IIC Early and Late Philistine Cities Database appears in digital form on the Harvard Semitic Museum website and is a complete presentation of the evidence with Context and Phasing Charts, Locus Summaries, and Material Culture Sample Lists.

Volume 9/3B The Iron Age I and IIC Late and Early Philistine Cities Plans and Sections includes every plan and section of each excavated Area in Field IV Lower.

 

Gitin S, Dothan T, Garfinkel Y. Tel Miqne-Ekron Excavations, 1985–1988, 1990, 1992–1995: Field IV Lower—The Elite Zone, Part 2: The Iron Age IIC Late Philistine City. Harvard Semitic Museum / Eisenbrauns; Forthcoming.
The Grammar of the Targum Neofiti
Golomb DM. The Grammar of the Targum Neofiti.; 1985. Publisher's Version
The Sheep of His Pasture: A Study of the Hebrew Noun "'Am(m)" and Its Semitic Cognates
Good RM. The Sheep of His Pasture: A Study of the Hebrew Noun "'Am(m)" and Its Semitic Cognates.; 1983. Publisher's Version
Syriac Manuscripts: A Catalogue
Goshen-Gottstein M. Syriac Manuscripts: A Catalogue.; 1979. Publisher's Version
The Archaeology of Jordan and Beyond: Essays in Memory of James A. Sauer
Greene JA, Coogan MD, Stager LE ed. The Archaeology of Jordan and Beyond: Essays in Memory of James A. Sauer.; 2000. Publisher's VersionAbstract

James A. Sauer was for many years the Director of the American Center of Oriental Research in Amman, Jordan, leading it to the preeminent place it now occupies as a research institution dedicated to the archaeology and history of Transjordan. This volume honors him, with more than 50 contributions from colleagues and friends.

With this volume, the Harvard Semitic Museum inaugurates a new series entitled "Studies in the Archaeology and History of the Levant."

Textual Studies in the Book of Joshua
Greenspoon LJ. Textual Studies in the Book of Joshua.; 1983. Publisher's Version
The Development of the Arabic Scripts: From the Nabatean Era to the First Islamic Century
Gruendler B. The Development of the Arabic Scripts: From the Nabatean Era to the First Islamic Century.; 1993. Publisher's VersionAbstract

In this volume, Beatrice Gruendler addresses a perplexing problem -- the development of Arabic script from its ancestor alphabet, Nabatean. Her work sorts through texts, inscriptions, and papyri to piece together the evolutionary trail of the Arabic alphabet. Profusely illustrated with line drawings and charts, this study will remain a sourcebook for researching the history of Arabic.

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Studies in Neo-Aramaic
Heinrichs W ed. Studies in Neo-Aramaic.; 1990. Publisher's Version
Narrative Structure and Discourse Constellations: An Analysis of Clause Function in Biblical Hebrew Prose
Heller R. Narrative Structure and Discourse Constellations: An Analysis of Clause Function in Biblical Hebrew Prose.; 2004. Publisher's VersionAbstract

One of the perennial problems within the study of biblical Hebrew syntax is how the five basic verbal clause types - QATAL, YIQTOL, WeQATAL, WeYIQTOL and WAYYIQTOL - as well as participial and verbless clauses provide the meaning and structure of narrative prose.

This definitive study examines two cases of extended narrative: The Novella of Joseph (Genesis 37, 39-47) and the Court Narrative of David (2 Samuel 9-20; 1 Kings 1-2) and analyzes the independent clauses within each.

This comprehensive examination demonstrates that the arrangement of clause types in narrative is not random or infinite. In narrative, specific sets of differing types of clauses either begin or conclude paragraphs or provide two types of commentary upon certain elements of the narrative. In direct discourse, a limited number of clause constellations can occur. Differing clause types in narrative, therefore, determine the structure of the storyline; differing clause types in direct discourse determine the purpose of the speech.

The Epic of the Patriarch: The Jacob Cycle and the Narrative Traditions of Canaan and Israel
Hendel RS. The Epic of the Patriarch: The Jacob Cycle and the Narrative Traditions of Canaan and Israel.; 1988. Publisher's Version
The God of My Victory: The Ancient Hymn in Habakkuk 3
Hiebert T. The God of My Victory: The Ancient Hymn in Habakkuk 3.; 1986. Publisher's Version
Key to A Grammar of Akkadian
Huehnergard J. Key to A Grammar of Akkadian.; 2013. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Professor Huehnergard's key to his extensive Akkadian Grammar will be welcomed by teacher and student alike. Please note that this third edition of the key is a revision that complements the third edition of the Grammar, incorporating a numer of corrections.

The Akkadian of Ugarit
Huehnergard J. The Akkadian of Ugarit.; 1989. Publisher's Version
Ugaritic Vocabulary in Syllabic Transcription
Huehnergard J. Ugaritic Vocabulary in Syllabic Transcription.; 2008. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Huehnergard's pioneering monograph investigated the essentially unvocalized nature of the alphabetic script used to write Ugaritic, which is, of course, a major hindrance to our attempts to understand the language and its texts. Without a clear picture of the vocalization of the language, we cannot understand its word structure and, thus, its morphology. Apart from the three aleph signs used in Ugaritic, the major source for the vocalization of the language is Ugaritic texts written in syllabic cuneiform.

This fine resource by Huehnergard was first published in 1987 and has been out of print for several years. In this revised edition, Huehnergard adds an appendix of 32 pages of new materials and corrections, all keyed to the original publication. A complete set of indexes—including texts cited and words in various Semitic languages—provides handy access to the wealth of data presented in the book. The revised edition thus brings this important reference work fully up to date and once again makes it available to students of Ugaritic specifically and Northwest Semitic in general.

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